Speech and Language Milestones

It is important to note that every child develops at his/her own pace; the following outlines when most children reach language milestones. Please contact Kamloops Speech and Language if you have further questions or concerns.

Milestone Source: Speech Language and Audiology Canada

Birth to 3 Months

  • The child makes cooing sounds

  • The child has different cries for different needs

  • The child smiles at you

  • The child is startled due to loud sounds

  • The child is soothed/calmed by a familiar voice

4 to 6 Months

  • The child babbles and makes different sounds

  • The child makes sounds back to you when you talk

  • The child enjoys games like peek-a-boo

  • The child turn his/her eyes toward a sound source

  • The child responds to music or toys that make noise

7 to 12 Months

  • The child should wave hi/bye

  • The child responds to his/her name

  • The child lets you know what he/she wants using sounds, and actions like pointing

  • The child begins to follow simple directions (e.g., Where is your nose?)

  • The child localizes sound by turning his/her head toward the sound

  • The child pays attention when spoken to

12 to 18 Months

  • The child should use common words and start to put words together

  • The child enjoys listening to storybooks

  • The child points to body parts or pictures in a book when asked

  • The child looks at your face when talking to you

18 to 24 Months

  • The child understands more words than he/she can say

  • The child says two words frequently (e.g., More juice)

  • The child asks simple questions (e.g., What’s that?)

  • The child takes turns in a conversation

2 to 3 Years

  • The child should use sentences of three or more words most of the time

  • The child understands different concepts (e.g., in-on; up-down)

  • The child follows two-part directions (e.g., take the book and put it on the table)

  • The child answers simple questions (e.g., Where is the car?)

  • The child participates in short conversations

3 to 4 Years

  • The child should tell a short story or talk about daily activities

  • The child talks in sentences with adult-like grammar

  • The child generally speaks clearly so people understand him/her

  • The child hears you when you call to them from another room

  • The child listens to the television at the same volume as others

  • The child answers a variety of questions

4 to 5 Years

  • The child should tell a short story or talk about daily activities

  • The child talks in sentences with adult-like grammar

  • The child generally speaks clearly so people understand him/her

  • The child hears you when you call to them from another room

  • The child listens to the television at the same volume as others

  • The child answers a variety of questions

Frequently Asked Questions – FAQ

A

It is always a smart decision to have your child assessed if you have any concerns with their speech or language – it is NOT a good idea to “wait and see”. Most children who are late to talk will catch up with their peers, but research shows that they have an increased risk for reading, spelling, and/or overall learning difficulties as they get older. Early intervention to treat communication problems is the key to developing age level appropriate speech and language skills.

Please see Speech and Language Milestones for more information about your child’s communication development.

A

Chronic ear infections can cause problems with hearing. If a child has trouble hearing, he will have trouble understanding, imitating and using speech. Other risk factors for communication delays/disorders include: premature birth, head trauma, developmental delays, oral-motor problems, chronic or prolonged pacifier use, and a family history of speech, language and/or learning problems.

A

This is a difficult question to answer, and it varies depending on the nature of the communication problem, the age of the child, the nature of the child, and the results of the assessment. Kamloops Speech and Language Services may be able to give you some idea as to the length of the therapy after your child’s assessment.

A

No, caregivers can refer to Kamloops Speech and Language Services themselves. Contact us here.

A

Speaking two or more languages does not cause a speech/language delay or disorder; children who speak two or more language will start speaking within the same time frame as children who speak one language. At Kamloops Speech and Language Services, we encourage families to speak to their children in whichever language they feel most comfortable (this is referred to as the “home language”).

If the child requires speech therapy, we will teach parents and caregivers in language strategies to help the child learn their home language.

A

Speech refers to “how” we produce language and involves articulating sounds, using the vocal folds to produce sound, and the rhythm of speech.

Language is a shared code that represents concepts with arbitrary symbols (i.e., words) and provides a set of rules as to how those symbols can be combined together to create meaning. This is an entire system of expressing and receiving information and is shared socially. We need to both use and understand language.

See What We Do for more information.

Resource Links

Make An Appointment

If you think your child would benefit from additional support to develop his or her communication skills, we are here to help.

CONTACT US

Make An Appointment

If you think your child would benefit from additional support to develop his or her communication skills, we are here to help.

CONTACT US